Star Spangled Banner Fabric Tribute Mary Baxter Quilt

TributeMaryBaxterQuilt

Originally uploaded by DCHill-FC VA

I did a search in Flickr for star spangled banner fabric and came up with the great small quilt made by Diane Hill.

Here is what she wrote about the quilt.

“I made this little quilt (2x”x22″) in 1992/93 as a tribute to Mary Baxter ‘s Flag Quilt, c. 1898-1910, that is in the collection of the American Folk Art Museum in NY City. (I was a docent at the museum back then, when I lived in Montclair NJ). I was inspired to make my tribute to her by the fabrics that came out to celebrate the 500-year anniversary of Columbus’ 1492 voyage to America. The fabric in the upper and lower outer borders is the words to the Pledge of Allegiance. The quilting designs are stars and ribbons, like flags waving. Mary Baxter lived in Kearny NJ and made her quilt in support of the Spanish American War in 1898.Her quilt is an example that women throughout American history used their needles and sewing to make political statements – even long before women got the right to vote in 1920! Here is a link to for a photo of Mary baxter’s actual quilt: http://www.artnet.com/magazine/features/karlins/karlins7-25-5.asp – Diane Hill, now of Falls Church VA”

Mary Baxter’s Quilt

IMGA0007

I did not realize the star spangled banner fabric that is in the flag quilt in my last post was to celebrate the 500 year anniversary of Columbus’ 1492 voyage to America…..hhhmmmmmm that means 1992 that fabric came out. Which means I probably started that quilt around that time. So….I just finished a wall quilt I started 17 years ago…..could it really be I started it that long ago. I don’t think so.

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5 Responses to “Star Spangled Banner Fabric Tribute Mary Baxter Quilt”

  1. Diane Hill Says:

    Thx for the email heads-up — I love that you blogged about this and that I shared something useful about the fabrics (I have a keen interest in fabric and quilt history — which is how I first got inspired to make my own quilts). And just like in decades long past, our quilts of the 20th century will be able to be dated by the quilting fabrics that were manufactured at certain dates.

    Like the fabrics that came out for the 1876 Centennial (see for example: http://maps.google.com/maps?q=2437+15th+Street,+NW+20009&ie=UTF8&split=0&gl=us&ei=56tWSqu7O5H4Ner5kJ0I&ll=38.92164,-77.03491&spn=0.007095,0.019205&z=16&iwloc=A ).

    And from the 1976 Bicentennial if you google Bicentennial quilt.

    Very kool. Thanks for sharing! – Diane Hill, the quilt maker!

  2. quiltedthrifted Says:

    Diane thanks the history written in these links is amazing. I adjusted the hyperlink on the post. I would love to go to a museum and see a turn of the century quilt. This one would be really great to see.
    I have to tell you personally that I really like the quilt you made. It is uncomplicated but has a wonderful feel of patriotism to it.

  3. Diane Hill Says:

    Thx – and YIKES, sorry I keep messing up pasting in my links!! I just did it again… here is the RIGHT one for quilts I’ve made:
    http://www.facebook.com/album.php?aid=82270&id=675659846&l=4f33e8f6b6

    Where do you live? I bet there are historical societies or museums where you can find some 1870s quilt to see and study. And at least you can via the web! Here is a good site as a start too: http://www.quilthistory.com/ . I belong to a “quilt History Dating” group here in Wash DC suburbs where we get together every so often to share our finds and learn the history of dyes and fabrics (click on Dating at left frame).

    I love your quilts and blog – THANKS for sharing!

    Diane

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